On Jonas’ “L’Opéra,” and Massenet’s “Le Cid”

Poster of Massenet’s “Le Cid,” also featured in “L’Opéra”

I have been listening rather obsessively to Jonas’ most recent album of French repertoire, L’Opéra. (That is, when I’m not obsessively relistening to passages from Don Carlos!) One can see and sample, at the previous link, the arias included in this album, from Gounod to Massenet to Bizet, including a gorgeous “Au fond du temple saint” sung with Ludovic Tézier.

This album is more “up my alley,” as they say, than the recent Dolce Vita. (But hey, I would listen to Jonas sing the alphabet song, when it comes to that, so I am far from complaining!) L’Opéra is exquisitely sung and orchestrated, and the CD comes in a beautiful cover with a booklet of photos ~ including  some of the stunning Palais Garnier which comprises the outside and inside background of the CD cover ~ and the lyrics to each aria, both in English and French.

Jonas Kaufmann’s recent album of French repertoire, “L’Opéra”

Aside from the dazed and giddy feeling on hearing Jonas sing my name in #12 (“Rachel, quand du Seigneur” from La Juive, by Fromental Halévy), the real revelation of this beautiful album was, for me, first hearing the transcendent aria from Massenet’s Le Cid, “Ô Souverain, ô Juge, ô Père.” I am surprised that this aria has managed to escape me before. It was truly a revelation, and has sent me on a quest to get to know this opera. (Link above to Jonas singing it previous to the album.)

Here are the lyrics, in English, thanks to this link:

 

Ah! All is over, finished!
My beautiful dream of glory,
my dreams of happiness,
have flown away forever!

You take away my love,
you take away my victory,
Lord, I submit myself to you!
Oh Lord, Oh Judge, Oh Father,
always veiled, (but) always present,
I loved you when times were good (prosperous)
And I praise you on somber days
I go where your law leads me,
free of human regrets.
Oh Lord, Oh Judge, Oh Father,
your image alone for my soul is
where I submit into your hands.

Oh Heaven above, so blue, so bright…
spirits from above, looked at me,
although this soldier may be in despair,
but his Christian faith remains.
You may come, you may appear to me,
at the dawn of the eternal day.
Oh Lord, Oh Judge, Oh Father!
As the servant of a just Lord,
I will respond to your call without fear,
Oh Lord, Oh Judge, Oh Father!

It is too bad, in a way, that recordings of the aria in concert don’t tend to include the brief interlude of the chorus of heavenly voices, including that of St. James, as it does in the opera. It of course makes sense…but still, it is so beautiful that I wish it could be included in every version.

A few notes on the opera: Massenet’s 4-act opera premiered in Paris in 1885, based on the Pierre Corneille play, with libretto by Louis Gallet, Adolphe d’Ennery and Edouard Blau. The story is one of honor and duty, versus love; of interpersonal and familial struggles within the politics of 11th century Spain. Rodrigue, a valiant warrior who is later nicknamed “le Cid” (“the Lord”), is knighted by the King in Act I, and Rodrigue’s hoped-for marriage to his beloved Chimène is approved. But in addition to these honors, Rodrigue’s father, Don Diègue, is made the protector of the King’s daughter. This act is felt, by the Conte de Gormas (Chimène’s father), to be a deliberate snub to himself. Gormas proceeds to insult Don Diègue, compromising the latter’s honor. In order to regain it, Don Diègue begs his son to challenge Gormas. Rodrigue knows that such an act would estrange him from his beloved Chimène forever; yet, honor bids him fight. Ironically, as my mom has pointed out about the original Corneille play, the very thing that Chimène loves about Rodrigue is his honor; thus, it is a catch-22. I won’t spoil the rest, except to say that the exquisite aria comes in the midst of what Rodrigue believes will be his final battle for the glory of Spain, as he and his army appear to be defeated, or nearly so.

I loved this opera, and want to continue to get better acquainted with it. Along with the stunning Act III aria ~ a fulfillment of earlier set-up in Rodrigue’s vision of, and dedication to, Saint James of Compostella ~ I also particularly loved the Act I knighting scene, and the ceremonial chorus of bells and voices that precedes and follows it.

Unfortunately, there is no recording, CD nor DVD nor elsewhere, of our tenor singing the title role. So, I looked elsewhere, and found a broadcast which, at the time of this writing, is available on YouTube, from the Washington Opera, with Placido Domingo and Elisabete Matos. I chose this recording first because of the obliging English subtitles. It was a lovely production with spectacular costumes and staging, even if the video quality looks like a VHS recording of a TV broadcast, which might well be the case. It’s a treasure.

My second experience of the opera was also thanks to YouTube. It is from l’Opéra de Marseille, 2011, with Roberto Alagna in the lead and it still can be found at this link at the time of this post. I waited on this production, as it doesn’t have the English subtitles, but once I had the gist of the story I was happy to follow along without them.

Roberto Alagna as “Le Cid”

I loved the costumes in this one, and the casting overall. Béatrice Uria-Monzon was a fantastic Chimène. It took me a bit to warm up to her, but I ended up loving both her voice and overall portrayal. She is strong and fierce, without losing a certain emotional vulnerability which is crucial. I felt the chemistry between the two leads, especially in their big scene together before the battle. As to Roberto, he not only has a beautiful voice especially for French repertoire, but there is something about him that makes our hearts go out to him; he is eminently watchable and lovable.

Rodrigue and Chimène, “Le Cid”

His visible distress, his hopeless courage, give one the irrational wish to take him into one’s arms and reassure him. One hears it in his voice: the earnest, distressed appeal. It is irresistible and I was behind him completely. It is this quality that makes Roberto so compelling in the earnest, noble, and self-sacrificing roles. It is what makes him such a lovely Don Carlos, particularly in the French, and a heartbreaking Cyrano de Bergerac.

I must also put a link here to Roberto’s irresistible “Ô Souverain, ô Juge, ô Père” which had me in tears…

What is it about the French repertoire that is so compelling at this time? From the French Don Carlos, to the French version of Les Vêpres Siciliennes, to Le Cid and L’Opéra…it seems to be a recurring theme at the moment. All I can say is that it is a beauty that has come rather unlooked for, and I’m thirsting for more.

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5 thoughts on “On Jonas’ “L’Opéra,” and Massenet’s “Le Cid”

  1. Another lovingly told piece of writing, dear Rachel. It seems the Paris trip has opened up a whole wider world of the delights of the French operatic repertoire to you, which so many of us will enjoy reading about. Thank you for sharing your thoughts.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I have to say I wouldn’t be trying to get to Munich for Jonas’ Parsifal were it not for Nina Stemme singing Kundry as well. What a Tristan und Isolde they would make! Her Isolde at the Met last winter was amazing. I can’t imagine the Staatsoper production will be anywhere near as good as the Met one Jonas sang in which is on Blu Ray and DVD. For all you obsessed ladies he gets his shirt off in it! But it is a masterful performance with wonderful support, that makes me wonder why he wants to do it again. Has he found something he thought he missed before? Only with an acting singer like Jonas can one get the feeling that it must be like an actor playing Hamlet, then returning to the role a few years later because he has thought of a new way to attack it. That and you get to be on stage with Nina Stemme!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Haha, yes, I love the Met Parsifal!! It was one of my first Wagner experiences…actually, Nina’s Tristan und Isolde (which I saw at the cinema) was my first! I was surprised by how much I was moved…she was fantastic, as was René as King Marke. As to BSO, I wrote to them the other day, as it was listed for being livestreamed on “Sat, July 8,” whereas July 8 falls on a Sunday next year…I am going to request the day off well ahead of time. Sure enough, it was just a misprint…it will be livestreamed Sun, July 8 😃 …not that I’m planning far ahead or anything!!!

      Like

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